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Not your grandfather’s architecture

Not your grandfather's architecture

Jeffrey DeMure is an architect by profession and a passionate generationalist by vocation. The principal of a thriving practice in Northern California, Jeff works and speaks all over the country on the subject of reinventing the model for 55+ living.

Jeff is quick to remind us that, with Americans living on average 30 years longer than they did at the beginning of the last century, there is no longer one profile for the retired. Three different generations inhabit this general category, with very different needs—and even more, very different attitudes about themselves and aging.

America’s oldest retirees are those of The Greatest Generation—the people who grew up with the Great Depression and fought in World War II. That group—now in their mid eighties and up—represents the more traditional image of the senior citizen.

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Holiday wishes

Holiday wishes

The Real Story wishes you a happy holiday season and stellar 2012. We’ll be back in January with more insights and conversations. In the meantime, be sure to like us on Facebook to get our podcasts delivered directly to your news feed.The entire 2011 lineup of The Real Story is available on iTunes.

Warmest wishes to all!


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Great changes a little at a time

Great changes a little at a time

When most people think about energy savings in a new home, their minds move almost immediately to solar power. Yet many of the smaller, less headline-worthy technologies readily available today are what really make the difference in one’s energy bills.

The Real Story is talking to Chuck Schoenberger, Executive Vice President of O’Brien Homes, about his company’s multi-family home community in Sunnyvale, Fusion. Fusion is being built inside the environs of a business park—a new direction for homebuilding, but surely one that makes sense when it comes to promoting an energy-conserving lifestyle. Chuck says that the residents can walk or bicycle to work, to retail or to public transportation. What’s more, because this community is considered “infill” in an established area, there are plenty of mature trees and greenbelts to blur the lines of the architecture and create a welcoming streetscape.

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